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Ivanhoe Chaput
(Unregistered)
03/14/15 07:37 PM
There is quite a difference...in my opinion. new Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

As Agjah and others point out, it's not merely draft angles that may be missing. Without making a book out of his article, there are many aspects to designing plastic injection molded parts such as thinning out ribs, sharp corners where you don't want sink marks and radii where added strength is needed. There may be places that require ejector pins and maybe a boss needs to be added or adding a slide for a required snap. There are material issues such as using a high percentage of glass for strength that may require a change in shape for fill or flow. There are gating types such as fan gates, overlap gates and film gates that need to be positioned for both function and cosmetics. And on and on. I've been a design engineer all my career, but I also have an artistic flair. In my business of 34 years, I've used industrial design firms and have often had to re-shape features for one reason or another. A DE firm such as mine will sometimes hire an ID firm, but I've never seen it the other way around. I can only assume that when one doesn't know, one doesn't ask. Yes, I agree, it's a recipe for disaster.

Masumaido Sekuzu
(Unregistered)
12/08/15 09:38 PM
Sample Size new Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

The notion that a person can excel in only one thing is narrow-minded. Sure, many people have specialties, but there exist people still who have more than one major skill or area of expertise.
It is understandable the frustration with those who claim to do more than they can deliver, but the way that emotion is conveyed should not be as to hold others back from their highest potentials by marking all as being in one single, limiting category or the other as this article does.
As to advice for the customer, request samples from the people with whom you would like to work, then make a decision based on the work those people have produced.

Igloo Girl
(Unregistered)
05/22/16 07:53 PM
Not exactly. new Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

As an Industrial Designer, who did a four year bachelor course nearly 20 years ago, it is my opinion that the above explanation isn't correct.
Firstly, an Industrial Designer is qualified to work as a Design Engineer. A Design Engineer may also work as an Industrial Designer. Both courses are so remarkably similar that Universities don't commonly offer both, but only offer one or the other. The handful of Universities that offer both, do so for marketing reasons and/or to provide a shorter degree course option (eg; one will be three years and the other four years). This is similar to the medical field (using the above analogy). Where degrees with different names imply different courses, but are actually all the same when you get down to the details - medical science, nursing, physio, sports medicine. Many of those courses share nearly identical units, they might adjust the order the classes are completed, but in the end they're more similar than different. Offering lots of courses boosts University intake and makes students feel catered too. Different 'degrees' might cost different amounts, even though the course is the same.
If an Industrial Designer lacks the skills to design for manufacture (designing with correct tolerances, gradients, materials and so on) then they are simply not very good at their job. The purpose of the degree/job is to design for manufacture. If they can't do that, well, they should receive further training on the job.
This issue has occurred because many Art School based design courses neglect the technical aspects of the Industrial Design course. Many of them focus on the aesthetics of products. These universities usually have excellent creative programs and can produce interesting looking designs. Is this the future of Industrial Design? All style, but no technical knowledge?
I learned at a technical University (I won't name it) where we were taught the relevant engineering of manufacturing processes by engineers and workshop technicians. We had engineering exams and every single design was critiqued and graded by a team including an engineer.
However, many aspects of designing for manufacture are best learned on the job. You don't truly understand mistakes until you make them.

Austin Stark
(Unregistered)
09/04/16 02:28 PM
Big Difference Between Industrial Design and Design Engineer new Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

I have a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering and a masters in Industrial Design. In engineering school students are not really taught how to design products. Engineering students are taught a lot of math and science. In the process they become very good at breaking problems down. When an engineering student graduates and is asked to design products they are going to make products that meet specifications, that will not break and can be manufactured. They are not very good at making products people want to use. I guess sometimes industrial designers think that they can do design engineers jobs because if a product does not require calculations then the education an engineer has completed has really only indirect benefits. These indirect benefits include being able to break down a problem very well and understanding physics much better than their Industrial design counterpart. An industrial designer could not be a design engineer at a place that sells lifting beams because that requires calculations to make sure the beam does not break and no one dies. Design engineering in my opinion is applied science and math.
Industrial designer’s education teaches them how to create experiences that connect with the products user. Industrial designers do this through understanding the users’ needs and wants. They create objects that are aesthetically pleasing easy to use and ergonomic. They learn how to innovate and create new products that solve users’ needs and wants. Engineers do not have the training to make aesthetically pleasing objects. They are much more focused on what makes the most logical sense in terms of money savings and physics. Since emotions are not logical engineers can completely ignore emotions therefore making products that no one wants to use.
I do not think that designers and engineers understand the need for the other profession because they think so differently. Doctors have the same med school education then they break off into specialties. An industrial designer might be focused on art his whole life and then majors in industrial design. An engineering student might be focused on math and sciences his whole life then majors in engineering. There is little overlap in education.
Both Engineers and Designers can be very innovative, but one deals with user experience and the other deals with making things work. There is a little overlap, but without training in both nether can come close to being able to do what the other does. A lot of people have talked about the importance of the intersection of humanities and the sciences. When you combine engineers and designers that is what you get. Both are most effective when they work collaboratively together.



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